News & Events

Journey of Hope Luncheon – Great Success!

DennisBounds.kids-smChildStrive’s Journey of Hope Luncheon raised over $60,000 thanks to the support of nearly 300 guests! The event was held May, 12th, 2016 at Xfinity Arena in Everett and featured Dennis Bounds (newly retired from King 5 News) as well as inspirational speakers. ChildStrive highlighted its many community partnerships through a new video and thanked Terry Clark for her exceptional leadership over the past eight years. ChildStrive’s new Executive Director, Jim Welsh, was introduced and welcomed as parents shared their stories of how ChildStrive has impacted their families’ lives. Our thanks to everyone who attended the event and a special thanks to all of our sponsors:

Gold Level: Boeing, Coastal Community Bank, Tulalip Tribes, and University Mechanical Contractors, Inc.

Silver Level: Dwayne Lane Family of Auto Centers, Edward Jones (Jesse O’Brien), The Everett Clinic, Molina Healthcare, Roy Robinson Chevrolet-Subaru-RV Center, United Healthcare, and Vine Dahlen

Bronze Level: Banner Bank, Leavitt Group Northwest, Providence Everett Medical Center, and Rodland Toyota

In-Kind: Alpha Graphics

Additional information about the 2016 Journey of Hope Luncheon can be found here.

Emotional Well-Being in Infants and Toddlers

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Out of all the important life skills parents teach their children, none may be more important than the skill of learning to manage emotions.  This is a skill that supports “school readiness” beyond any skill in reading or writing.  It is also a skill that research suggests can help reduce the onset of some mental health symptoms.

Children experience the same emotions as adults do.  Unfortunately, their brains do not yet have the capability to keep those emotions under control or “regulated”.  Emotion regulation is a very complex function in the brain.  It requires the inner most parts of the brain (“reptilian brain”) to coordinate with parts of the brain that make us human (“wise brain”).  These “wise” parts of the brain which help us reason and think through problems don’t even start to activate or turn on in the brain until our second year of life.  Effective emotion regulation requires being able to identify what we are feeling, what happened to make us feel that way, and what we can do to bring ourselves back to calm.  That requires a lot of thought!  Here’s the real tricky thing about the brain:  It is almost impossible to access the wise parts of the brain when our reptilian brain is flooded with emotion.    Think of some adults you know that become explosive or yell and scream when they are angry, and remember they have had decades of practice in managing their emotions (clearly not very successfully).  Now think again about why we would expect a small child with only a few dozen months of practice to manage the very skill many adults can’t do.

So you may be asking yourself, “How do adults teach this skill to a child?”  Research has shown that when an upset child is in the presence of a calm adult who is trying to understand what the child is feeling, children will be able to use the adult’s sense of calm to help themselves get calm.  Think back to a time when you were overwhelmed with a powerful emotion.  If someone near you was meeting the same intensity of emotion as yourself, you may have found it difficult to get calm.  However, if someone near you was calm and using a tone of voice that made you feel they were trying to understand your situation, you may have found it easier to get calm.  Children have the same experience!  Only when a child gets to a calm state can they take in information and “learn” from a situation.

In honor of the Mental Health Awareness Month find out more information on a variety of topics that support children’s mental health by attending the “Youth Mental Wellness Fair” happening on May 7th from 10-4 at Evergreen Middle School in Everett.

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Forming Lifelong Readers

parent-and-child-with-bookDid you know that just by reading aloud to your child on a daily basis you are helping him improve memory, expanding his imagination, helping him learn how he and others feel and preparing him for school readiness?  One of the best ways to help your child become a lifelong reader is to start early and read together. He will learn that books are both fun and meaningful.

Good Reading Habits:

  • Read every day. Reading before bed can help your child relax. Reading after a nap can help your child wake up. Try making 20 minutes your goal, and remember you can break it up into smaller amounts throughout the day.
  • Model Reading. Let your child see you looking at words in books, magazines, or newspapers.
  • Keep lots of books in your home. Keep books in your home – your own or from the library – and use them often! As your child gets older, let him play with books even when you’re not reading together.
  • Hold your child while you read. Children love being close to you and reading is a good time to snuggle up.
  • Name things in books. You don’t have to read the words in a book if she would rather just look at the pictures and point out familiar things.
  • Tell stories, sing songs, and play rhyming games. The more words your child hears, the better!
  • Read favorite books over and over and over. Children love repetition- and it helps with brain development too.
  • Encourage others to read to your child too. Ask a grandparent, babysitter or older sibling to read with them so your child recognizes that books are important to everyone they love.
  • Link books to things that are happening to them. Your child will start to recognize that characters in books are experiencing the same situations she is. This helps build empathy and gives her ideas for solving problems.

Remember one the greatest gift you can give your child is shared reading time.

ChildStrive Presents 8-week Parenting Program

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Circle of Security Parenting Series

This is an 8 week program designed to enhance attachment security between parents and children.

Thursdays, April 21st through Thursday, June 9th, 2016

6:00 – 7:30 PM

Location: Lynnwood ChildStrive Office ~ 3210 200th Place SW, Lynnwood, 98036

Register Online:  https://childstrive-circle-of-security.eventbrite.com

$75.00 (one or two parents)

Scholarships are available!!  Contact us at

Presented by Michelle Bianchi-Green, MS, LMFT and Emily Owen, LMFT (ChildStrive family counselors)


At times all parents feel lost or without a clue about what our child might need from us. Imagine what it might feel like if you were able to make sense of what your child was really asking from you. The Circle of Security® Parenting program is based on decades of research about how secure parent-child relationships can be supported and strengthened.

Parents of children ages birth to three are invited to join our 8 week program that will help you:

  • Learn how to recognize your child’s needs and better understand their behavior
  • Be supported as a parent and gain ideas on how to make parenting easier
  • Begin to understand your own reactions to your children,  learning how to manage your own thoughts and feelings  during frustrating moments
  • Learn how to help your child organize their feelings, meeting their emotional needs through tough times (tantrums, attention seeking, challenging behaviors)
  • Learn how to help your child to engage more in play and learning
– We are sorry but no childcare is available.
 
For more information: contact Emily Owen 425-512-7776 emily.owen@childstrive.org or Michelle Bianchi-Green
425-328-4647 michelle.bianchi-green@childstrive.org

 

Familias Sanas, Familias Felices – Healthy Families, Happy Families

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Join us at the Latino Health Fair
Únase a nosotros en la Feria Latina de Salud

ChildStrive will be hosting a table at the resource fair on Saturday.  Stop by and say hello!

Free health checks, activities for the whole family including drawings and giveaways.

Saturday, March 12th, 2016

10am – 3pm

Verdant Community Wellness Center

4710 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA  98036

Click here for more information:  Bilingualhealthfairflyer

Presented by The Family Support Center of South Snohomish County and UnitedHealthcare

 

ChildStrive Executive Director Search

With the announcement that Terry Clark, ChildStrive’s Executive Director for the past 8 years will be retiring in June, a search for a new Executive Director has commenced. This is an exciting opportunity for a visionary leader who is passionate about early learning, prevention, and family-centered services. The ChildStrive Board of Directors is seeking the next great leader to build upon the impressive accomplishments already achieved and take the organization to the next level of success. ChildStrive has a $4.3 million budget and employs 68 staff in its Everett and Lynnwood offices. Full details of the job description can be found here http://childstrive.org/careers/executive-director/

Executive Director Announces Retirement Plans

Terry Clark, Executive Director of ChildStrive for the past 8 years has announced that she will be retiring June 30, 2016. Terry announced her plans to the ChildStrive Board of Directors and staff last month and is hoping that a new Executive Director will be hired before her planned departure to ensure a smooth transition.  “I am passionate about our work and likely will remain so for the rest of my life. Still, this decision helps me prioritize the needs and interests of my family.  I am excited about the next steps of my life – more travel and time with my family – and I look forward to finding new ways to make a positive impact.”

At the time of her retirement, Terry Clark will have worked in the public and non-profit sector for more than 40 years.  The last eight at ChildStrive, focusing on prevention and early intervention services, has been the culmination of all of her work and has allowed her to work passionately in the area that is most important to her.  “I treasure the opportunity I have had to work with so many great people, and feel blessed to have been able to do such meaningful work.”

The ChildStrive Board of Directors is currently conducting a search for a new Executive Director.

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